Mother Earth and Uncle Sam: How Pollution and Hollow Government Hurt Our Kids


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Yosemite in the Sixties by Glenn Denny

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They're a pretty good-sized venue" he said. Jay Walker D-Prince George's , whose district includes National Harbor, called the development a "special place" that needs permits written expressly it. Walker said he is preparing an amendment to prohibit open containers at the beach where the cast aluminum sculpture known as the "Awakening" was reassembled this week after it was moved from Hains Point in the District. He said he worries that drunk people could injure themselves on the statue. Andre Gingles, an attorney representing National Harbor, said the development's leadership is comfortable that 40 licenses, 20 of which could be issued this year, are a sufficient number to help attract top restaurants.

Permits probably would have gone to locally owned minority businesses, even without legislation, Gingles said, but setting the standard in print was "in keeping with the public policy that we've worked on with the county and state. Some community activists have expressed concern that the project's potentially immense profits might largely benefit companies based outside the county. Most area officials have agreed that the project will be a significant boost to the economy.

Staff writer Philip Rucker contributed to this report. As dementia slowly claimed the year-old woman's mind in , she signed a power of attorney that gave her niece control over her finances.


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Soustek's grandnieces who served as her guardian until her death last month, said flaws in the state's power of attorney laws allowed the theft. And the two sisters are now working with Sen. Bryan Simonaire, R-Pasadena, to introduce "Loretta's Law" this afternoon to the Senate's Judicial Proceedings Committee in a move to make people with power of attorney more accountable for their actions.

Huesman, who will testify this afternoon with Ms. Hodgson in support of the bill - also known as the Power of Attorney Accountability Act. Simonaire said as the state's population gets older, more people are using power of attorneys.

Advisory Committee

He said there is a greater potential for people to abuse that power and the state's senior citizens need protection. Specifically, the bill would require a person with a power of attorney to keep a record of their receipts and payments and disclose that paperwork if requested. The person who gave the power of attorney, his guardian, or a representative of his estate would have authority to request the paperwork, as would the state. The scheme Skrzesz lined her pockets with her aunt's money for five years before anyone caught on to what was happening. Since Mrs. While Skrzesz said she built her house at Harlem Ave.

Soustek never lived there. Instead, Mrs. She said Skrzesz initially borrowed money from her brother to pay the bill, but the funds ran out after a couple of months. When the nursing home stopped getting paid in - Mrs. Huesman and Ms. Hodgson became their great aunt's guardian that year and reviewed her finances only to see Skrzesz was even cashing Mrs. Soustek's Social Security checks and pocketing the money. Circuit Court Judge Paul F. Harris sentenced Skrzesz to seven years in prison, but suspended the entire sentence as part of a plea agreement.

The Center for Progressive Reform

Long shot Although supporting the bill, the nieces said it isn't perfect. They wish it made it more difficult for someone to get a power of attorney; that it required annual paperwork or even random audits to catch more thieves.

But the women are already afraid the bill is a long shot since it could make life harder for many lawyers in the state. They feared any more provisions would kill some of their support. Nic Kipke, a longtime supporter of "Loretta's Law" withdrew a version of the bill earlier this week from the House of Delegates. He could not be reached for comment. Simonaire acknowledged some early doubts about the bill, but said he's spoken to some other senators and received widespread support.

Continued problems While working to change the law, the nieces still are battling with Skrzesz. To keep herself out of jail, Skrzesz agreed to sign over her 1,square-foot Pasadena home to her aunt's guardians and to pay restitution. Huesman said. Skrzesz is scheduled to go to court May 5 on charges she has violated her probation.

If convicted, she could go to prison for seven years. Independent budget analysts recommend eliminating the funding for the fiscal year that begins in July, arguing that money is being allocated to Maryland's stem cell program faster than it can be used. Officials with the state's stem cell research fund said that even a one-year funding hiatus would hurt the program, which provides grants to potentially life-saving research. John Kellermann, who is suffering from Parkinson's disease, told a legislative panel that families are counting on a cure or better treatment for a number of maladies that could be borne out by the research.

Some lawmakers said they support stem cell research but might be hard-pressed to continue funding at the same level as last year's, given the budgetary constraints. Edward J. Kasemeyer, a Baltimore County Democrat and chairman of the subcommittee with purview over the funding. Harry R. Hughes, who has been lobbying for stem cell research in recent years, said he called several lawmakers this week to urge them to keep next year's proposed funding intact.

Maryland and other states have provided funding for the science since President Bush restricted federal funding for stem cell research in Before states made funding available, researchers who wanted to use stem cells derived from embryos depended mostly on private grants or were limited to a few stem cell lines that qualified for federal money. The debate took a turn in November when scientists in Japan and at the University of Wisconsin announced that they had converted human skin cells into stem cells like the ones found in embryos.

Nancy E. Paltell of the Maryland Catholic Conference testified yesterday that the research eliminated any reason to destroy embryos for stem cell studies. She advocated cutting state funding for research.

Yosemite in the Sixties

Linda Powers, chairman of the state's stem cell commission, said other states have promised much higher levels of funding. Continued funding in Maryland is essential to attracting and retaining the best scientists and to a robust biotechnology industry, proponents said.

Cannell Chimes #27

Maryland Technology Development Corp. A budget analyst said that funds are being appropriated to the agency at a faster rate than the cash flow dictates, partly because it took time to draft program regulations. Once funding applications are submitted, they must go through an independent scientific peer review. But they said they have established guidelines to make the process more efficient, and they noted that grants are paid out over two to three years so that any remaining money in the fund has been earmarked for those grants.

Lowell Stoltzfus, an Eastern Shore Republican whose wife has Parkinson's, said he is opposed to embryonic stem cell research but supports the adult stem cell studies. At the same time, he said, the state faces a "budget crisis. Hopkins officials requested the increase in December to offset significant construction cost increases.

Mother Earth and Uncle Sam: How Pollution and Hollow Government Hurt Our Kids Mother Earth and Uncle Sam: How Pollution and Hollow Government Hurt Our Kids
Mother Earth and Uncle Sam: How Pollution and Hollow Government Hurt Our Kids Mother Earth and Uncle Sam: How Pollution and Hollow Government Hurt Our Kids
Mother Earth and Uncle Sam: How Pollution and Hollow Government Hurt Our Kids Mother Earth and Uncle Sam: How Pollution and Hollow Government Hurt Our Kids
Mother Earth and Uncle Sam: How Pollution and Hollow Government Hurt Our Kids Mother Earth and Uncle Sam: How Pollution and Hollow Government Hurt Our Kids
Mother Earth and Uncle Sam: How Pollution and Hollow Government Hurt Our Kids Mother Earth and Uncle Sam: How Pollution and Hollow Government Hurt Our Kids
Mother Earth and Uncle Sam: How Pollution and Hollow Government Hurt Our Kids Mother Earth and Uncle Sam: How Pollution and Hollow Government Hurt Our Kids

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